Assessing and Tracking Team Performance – Part 6: It Lives! But it’s Out of Control!

In the previous article for this series, I described three options managers could consider if moving the project deadline was out of the question.

  1. Increase employee work intensity
  2. Call for overtime
  3. Hire people

On the face of it, they each appeared to offer a path toward returning a drifting schedule to be on time. Now let’s look a little further down the road to see what happens when the juice is applied to each of these options in turn. If we implement any of these options, what are the likely consequences?

We know that errors in the work flow are unavoidable. If we encourage or pressure the development team to finish more work in less time (the Work Faster Loop1, Figure 1, C) this will result in an increase in the errors along with an increase in the amount of Work Done.

Figure 1 (click to enlarge)

This is the Haste Makes Waste Loop (Figure 1, F). In other words, the increase in Work Intensity will have a concomitant increase in the Error Fraction which means there is an increase in Errors generated. The extended consequence of pulling the Work Intensity lever is an increase in Work to Do in the form of extra Rework to Do.

OK. So Option 1 isn’t a get-out-of-jail-free card. There are strings attached. How about Option 2, call for the development team to work overtime?

Figure 2 (click to enlarge)

By increasing Overtime, the risk of Fatigue increases sharply. This results in yet another increase in the Error Fraction (tired people make more mistakes than rested people) and a decrease in Productivity (tired people don’t work as efficiently as rested people.) Both slow down Progress and increases the amount of Rework to Do in the system. This is the Burnout Loop (Figure 2, G).

OK. So Option 2 doesn’t lead to sunshine and roses. There are dark clouds and weeds in the mix. Let’s give Option 3 a go, hire more people!

Figure 3 (click to enlarge)

So we’ve beefed up the Workforce by hiring a bunch of people to join the team. With all those extra people in the mix we’ve also increased the overall Congestion and Communication Difficulties. The email traffic increases, everyone’s Inbox fills up faster, meeting attendee size increases along with the number of meetings. The signal to noise ratio decreases and miscommunication increases. This increases the Error Fraction, decreases Productive, and decreased Progress. End result: the Too Big to Manage Loop (Figure 3, H).

But that’s not all. By hiring extra people, we’ve activated the Expertise Dilution Loop (Figure 5, I).

Figure 5 (click to enlarge)

All those new hires don’t come in off the street ready to go. They decrease the depth of Experience available to focus on making progress. Experienced employees have to slow down and assist new employees in understanding the technical systems, the architecture, and development standards. New employees will need some period of time to become familiar with the work environment, project objectives,  who’s who, and where the coffee is.

As they work to understand and gain experience with the systems, new hires will necessarily make mistakes and increase the Error Fraction. While there are more workers available to focus on the product backlog, the available expertise is spread much more thinly and is collectively less experienced until such time the new workers are up to speed with what needs to be done and how. So the errors go up and Productivity goes down. The down stream effect is often a further increase in the Delay to Completion. As the saying goes, throwing more people at the problem more often than not makes the problem worse.

OK. So no unicorns and rainbows here either. More like a lot of warthogs and rain.

Looks like the first level effects were negated by the second level consequences. That’s bad enough, but the third level consequences can be even worse in that they are often much longer lasting and much more difficult to resolve. We’ll look at those in the next article in this series.

Previous article in the series: Assessing and Tracking Team Performance – Part 5: Welcome to the Labyrinth

Next article in the series: Assessing and Tracking Team Performance – Part 7: “Abandon All Hope,…”

References

1The core of the model I use to assess team and organization health is based on the work of James Lyneis and David Ford: System Dynamics Applied to Project Management, System Dynamics Review Volume 23 Number 2/3 Summer/Fall 2007