Drive for Teams

I recently re-read Daniel Pink’s book, “Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us.” I read it when it was first published and I was still managing technical teams. Super brief summary: The central idea of the book is that people are mostly driven by intrinsic motivation based on three aspects:

  • Autonomy — The desire to be self directed.
  • Mastery — The urge to improve skills.
  • Purpose — The desire to engage with work that has meaning and purpose.

I find this holds true for individuals. However, when applied to teams optimizing for these three aspects can be problematic. If an individual on a team seeks to maximize autonomy, they are likely to come into conflict with the objectives of the team. For example, a software team that is tasked with developing a component that is expected to interact with several other components developed by other teams. If a single developer, in the interests of maximizing their individual autonomy, has decided to develop the component according to standards, design principles, and tools that are different from those of teammates and other teams (essentially, a local optimization,) then the result is likely to be sub-optimal overall.

Some individual autonomy must necessarily be sacrificed in the interests of effective collaboration. It’s possible, even desirable, that individual pursuits of mastery and purpose can be maintained. However, it may be necessary for an individual to focus on mundane tasks and the objectives of the team for periods of time. Finding ways to maintain a healthy balance between the intrinsic motivators and the purpose of the team is no small task and, when found, requires constant attention to maintain.

Perhaps it is possible to attach the team’s or organization’s purpose to the interests of the individual. Or sort for hiring people who have a personal purpose that is in-line with the organization’s purpose.

Baseballs and Hockey Pucks

“Keep your eye on the ball!” I was always coached when learning how to play baseball. Seemed like reasonable advice while standing at the plate, facing down the pitcher for the opposing team. Certainly wouldn’t want to be daydreaming or casting my gaze to the horizon. It didn’t seem to help, though. I excelled at striking out.

Later…much later…I came across Wayne Gretzky’s quote: “Skate to where the puck is going, not where it has been.” I wonder if I had learned to figure out where the baseball was going to be and made sure my bat was there to meet it if I might have spent more time on bases. Keeping my eye on the ball didn’t tell me much about when to start my swing.

No regrets. I still love the game (as it was, not as it currently is.)

I think of this Gretzky quote when I watch product owners struggle with organizing their backlog. (I also think how tragic it is that the business world has beat this quote into an intolerable pulpy platitude.)

Ask a product owner what their team is working on today, they should be able to give a succinct answer. Ask them what their team is going to be working on in three months and watch the clock. The longer they can go on about what their team is going to be working on, the healthier their backlog is likely to be. Struggling product owners scramble to keep their teams busy sprint-to-sprint. Good product owners can see where their teams are going to be in several months. Great product owners see to the end of the game.

Teaching Product Owners How To Fish

Product owners are responsible for defining WHAT the Agile team needs to create. The team is responsible for deciding HOW to build WHAT the product owner needs.

I don’t think any Agilist would fundamentally disagree with that statement. Where there is inevitably a great deal of discussion and disagreement is describing the boundary between “WHAT” and “HOW.” Is it thin or thick? How much overlap is there? Does this depend on the nature of the work or is there a fixed standard? Does it have to be determined for every story? These are often not easy questions to answer.

While reading some neuroscience material yesterday regarding how our brains construct “concepts,” the topic lead into the notion of “goal-based concepts.” Since I’m not a neuroscientist but an Agilist looking for ways neuroscientific discoveries can be applied to the implementation of Agile principles and practices, the material had me thinking about how product owners might learn from the idea of “goal-based concepts.” How can I teach them about the “WHAT” such that they better understand the type and amount of detail the team needs in order to figure out the “HOW?”

I came up with a series of short dialogs:

Product Owner (to team): I need a fish.

Team: OK.

(Team goes off to work on “fish” and returns the next day with a catfish.)

PO: That’s not what I wanted! I need a fish!

(Team goes off to work on “fish” and returns the next day with a nurse shark.)

PO: That’s not what I wanted either!

What if the PO had been more clear about not just WHAT she wanted, but the goal for that WHAT. That is, a description of the problem that the WHAT was intended to solve.

PO: I’m opening a fish store. I need a fish.

(Team goes off to work on “fish for fish store” and returns the next day with a goldfish.)

PO: That’s good. But it’s not enough. I need more fish. Different kinds of fish.

(The team goes off to work on “variety of fish for fish store” and returns the next day with guppies, mollies, swordtails, and angelfish.)

PO: Cool!

Or version two:

PO: I’m opening a restaurant. I need a fish.

(Team goes off to work on “fish for restaurant” and returns the next day with Poached Salmon in Dill Sauce.)

PO: That’s good. But it’s not enough. I need more fish. Different kinds of fish.

(The team goes off to work on “variety of fish for restaurant” and returns the next day with Miso-Glazed Chilean Sea Bass, Mediterranean Stuffed Swordfish, and Pan Seared Lemon Tilapia.)

PO: Yum!

Hopefully, you can see that by providing a little of the “WHY” for the “WHAT” has helped the team do a better job of delivering WHAT the product owner wanted.

Of course, these are simplified examples. There are many additional details the product owner could have supplied that would have helped the team dial in on exactly WHAT she needed. In the first dialog, the team had to make guesses about what the product owner meant by the rather broad concept of “fish.” In the subsequent dialogs, the team at least had the benefit of the context that was of interest to the product owner. In these cases, the team had a better understanding of the goal the product owner had in mind.

In Agile-speak, this context or goal information would be provided in the “As a…” and “…so that…” part of the story. “As a restaurant owner I want fish so that patrons can enjoy a variety of menu options.”

The less clear the product owner is on these elements, the longer it’s going to take for the team to guess what she really wants.

We’re Good, Yes?

No.

No, we’re not.

I’m adding this phrase to my list of markers that indicate things in a relationship are still not settled. It’s another form of the “seeking forgiveness instead of asking permission” bromide. A self-printed get-out-of-jail-free card. If not that, it’s a dodge to get out from under the burden of an uncomfortable situation at the expense of leaving things tangled and for the most part unresolved.

Here’s a typical scenario.

A product owner or executive faces a decision that affects the workload on a team. Rather than work with marketing, for example, to defer their request for new features to a future release or shift the delivery date to accommodate the request, the decision maker takes the easy path, agrees to the change without adjusting anything else in the system, and drops the extra work on the team.

To make matters worse, the team is informed by email. The team is understandably upset and more than a little confused about the immediate change in course. It’s left to the scrum master to make sense of the e-grenade and deal with the shrapnel. The expected back-channeling and grousing quickly attracts the attention of a wider audience and a full-on electrical storm ensues.

After way too many expensive people are involved and someone with some skill and authority gets control of the situation, work gets renegotiated, timelines are shifted, and work that could and should have been done by the original decision maker gets done by a cadre of ancillary and executive staff.

The original decision maker circles back around to the scrum master, apologies for the “misunderstanding,” and dashes off with a wave and a “We’re good, yes?”

In all likelihood, you’re not. In fact, the difficult conversation that needs to happen is just beginning. What lead up to this explosion? How could the decision maker handled the situation better? What do they need to succeed at navigating future occurrences like this with marketing? What’s different such that the team has confidence this won’t happen again? Does the decision maker understand the consequences to taking the easy way? The hits to time, money (in terms of salaries), and morale can be significant, particularly if  scenarios like this are a frequent occurrence.

Whether you find yourself about to utter this phrase or you’re on the receiving end, know that the work to resolve the issue and move forward has only just begun. Pick up the pieces, learn from the experience, and build something better.

What to do while on “vacation” during a pandemic.

Build a Torii Gate, of course.

A vacation originally planed for this week in Utah was scrubbed. So a significant pivot was in order. Priorities, plans, and schedules shifted and forward motion was begun once again.

I wanted to build a Torii Gate on the East side of my property for several years. The gate and fence that was there worked well enough so it never made it very far up on the backlog. That changed last fall when the Chinook winds – which are frequent, sudden, and fierce in this part of the country – snapped  the two supporting gate posts. (The same storm also blew off the gate on the North side of the property, but that’s another project.) The gate and fence have been braced up by 2×4’s all winter. Not a good look.

Worked on the hashira (posts) over the winter. They needed to withstand the Chinooks. So, 6′ steel post – 3′ bolted within 3 2x6x10s and 3′ sunk into a concrete base – ought to hold for a while.

Time to begin the outside work.

First post had to be set perfectly. This is after it had set for a few days and most of the supports had been pulled away.

Next, the nuki (lower beam) and the shimagi and kasagi (two upper beams.)

Add a little extra flair trim to the kasagi, stain, and seal.

All that was need to complete the Torii gate part of the gate was the gakuzuka – a small brace in the center between the shimagi and kasagi – with an inscription. The weather intervened and brought us about 9″ of fresh snow.

Weather cleared, snow melted, still self-isolating – back to work to build and install the new swinging gate.

Next, dress up the top of the swinging gate with a pattern to match the fence on the north side of the property.

Finally, add the gakuzuka. The Japanese kanji on the way into the gate is “Love.” Find love here, all ye who enter.

The kanji on the way out through the gate is “Peace.” Take peace with you into the world.

Add an exterior handle crafted from ceder and the gate is done. The street view is quite nice, even before the summer vines and surrounding flowers wake up.

Time now to clean up the work site and do a little path repair.

Update – 2020.07.25

Just following a rain storm and the summer foliage starting to grow back.

The Pull of Well-Crafted Product Visions and Release Goals

There was even a trace of mild exhilaration in their attitude. At least, they had a clear-cut task ahead of them. The nine months of indecision, of speculation about what might happen, of aimless drifting with the pack were over. Now they simply had to get themselves out, however appallingly difficult that might be. [1]

In the early 20th Century, Sir Ernest Shackleton led an expedition attempting to cross the South Pole on foot. He was unsuccessful in that attempt. What he succeeded at, however, was something far more impressive. After nearly two years of battling conditions south of the Antarctic Circle, Shackleton saw to it that all 27 men of his crew made it safely home. As Alfred Lansing notes, “Though they had failed dismally even to come close to the expedition’s original objective, they knew now that somehow they had done much, much more than ever they set out to do.”

There is much I could write about the lessons from Shackleton, his crew, and the Endurance that apply to our own individual endeavors – personal and professional. For the moment, I wish to reflect on the sheer clarity of the goal 28 men had in 1915-1916: To survive, by any means and nothing short of complete dedicated effort.

To be sure, their goal was self-serving – no one can judge them for that – and no product team is ever likely to be placed in a situation of delivering in the face of such high stakes. Indeed, the lessons from Endurance are striking in their contrast to just how feeble the drama is that is often brought into product delivery schedules. We call them “death marches,” but we know not of what we speak.

One of the things we can learn from Endurance is the power of a clearly defined objective. Do or die. That’s pretty damn clear. Time and time again, Shackleton’s crew were faced with completing seemingly impossible tasks under the harshest of conditions with the barest of resources and vanishingly small chances for success.

What kept them going? Certainly, the will and desire to live. There were many other factors, too. What interests me in this post is reflected in the opening quote. The emergence of a well-defined task that cleared away the fog of speculation, indecision, and uncertainty. Episodes like this are described multiple times in Lansing’s book.

Why this is important to something like a product vision is that it clearly illustrates a phenomenon I learned about recently called “The Goal Gradient Hypothesis,” which basically says our efforts increase as we get closer to our goals. But here’s the rub. We have to know and understand what the goal is. “Do or die” is clear and leaves little room for misunderstanding. “Let’s go build a killer app,” not so much.

From the research:

We found that members of a café RP accelerated their coffee purchases as they progressed toward earning a free coffee. The goal-gradient effect also generalized to a very different incentive system, in which shorter goal distance led members to visit a song-rating Web site more frequently, rate more songs during each visit, and persist longer in the rating effort. Importantly, in both incentive systems, we observed the phenomenon of postreward resetting, whereby customers who accelerated toward their first reward exhibited a slowdown in their efforts when they began work (and subsequently accelerated) toward their second reward. [2]

Far away goals, like a product vision, are much less motivating than near-term goals, such as sprint goals. And yet it is the product vision that can, if well-crafted and well-communicated, pull a team forward during a postreward resetting period.

But perhaps the most important lesson from the research – as far as product development is concerned – is that incentives matter.  How an organization structures these is important. Since most people fail The Marshmallow Test, rewarding success on smaller goals that lead to a larger goal is likely to help teams stay focused and dedicated in the long run. Rather than one large post-product release celebration, smaller rewards after each successful sprint are more likely to keep teams engaged and productive.

References

[1] Lansing, A. (1957) Endurance: Shackleton’s Incredible Voyage, pg. 80

[2] Kivetz, R., Urminsky, O., Zheng, Y (2006) The Goal-Gradient Hypothesis Resurrected: Purchase Acceleration, Illusionary Goal Progress, and Customer Retention, Journal of Marketing Research, 39 Vol. XLIII (February 2006), 39–58

Center Point: The Product Backlog

If a rock wall is what is needed, but the only material available is a large boulder, how can you go about transforming the latter into the former?

Short answer: Work.

Longer answer: Lots of work.

Whether the task is to break apart a physical boulder into pieces suitable for building a wall or breaking up an idea into actionable tasks, there is a lot of work involved. Especially if a team is inexperienced or lacks the skilled needed to successfully complete such a process.

Large ideas are difficult to work with. They are difficult to translate into action until they are broken down into more manageable pieces. That is, descriptions of work that can be organized into manageable work streams.

We choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard; because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one we intend to win, and the others, too.President John Kennedy

That’s a pretty big boulder. In fact, it’s so big it served quite well as a “product vision” for the effort that eventually got men safely to and from the moon in 1969. Even so, Kennedy’s speech called out the effort that it would take to realize the vision. Hard work. Exceptional energy and skill. What followed in the years after Kennedy’s speech in 1962 was a whole lot of boulder-busting activity

A user story is a brief, simple statement from the perspective of the product’s end user. It’s an invitation for a conversation about the what’s needed so that the story can meet all the user’s expectations.

In it’s simplest form, this is all a product backlog is. A collection of doable user stories derived from a larger vision for the product and ordered in a way that allows for a realistic path to completion to be defined. While this is simple, creating and maintaining such a thing is difficult.

Experience has taught me that the single biggest impediment to improving a team’s performance is the lack of a well-defined and maintained product backlog. Sprint velocities remain volatile if design changes or priorities are continually clobbering sprint scope. Team morale suffers if they don’t know what they’re going to be working on sprint-to-sprint or, even worse, if the work they have completed will have to be reworked or thrown out. The list of negative ripple effects from a poor quality product backlog is a long one.


Boulder image by pen_ash from Pixabay

Crafting a Product Vision

In his book, “Crossing the Chasm,” Geoffrey Moore offers a template of sorts for crafting a product vision:

For (target customer)

Who (statement of the need or opportunity)

The (product name) is a (product category)

That (key benefit, problem-solving capability, or compelling reason to buy)

Unlike (primary competitive alternative, internal or external)

Our product/solution (statement of primary differentiation or key feature set)

To help wire this in, the following guided exercise can be helpful. Consider the following product vision statement for a fictitious software program, Checkwriter 1.0:

For the bill-paying member of the family who also uses a home PC

Who is tired fo filling out the same old checks month after month

Checkwriter is a home finance program for the PC

That automatically creates and tracks all your check-writing.

Unlike Managing Your Money, a financial analysis package,

Our product/solution is optimized specifically for home bill-paying.

Ask the team to raise their hand when an item on the following list of potential features does not fit the product/solution vision and to keep it up unless they hear an item that they feel does fit the product/solution vision. By doing this, the team is being asked, “At what point does the feature list begin to move outside the boundaries suggested by the product vision?” Most hands should go up around item #4 or #5. All hands should be up by #9. A facilitated discussion related to the transition between “fits vision” and “doesn’t fit vision” is often quite effective after this brief exercise.

  1. Logon to bank checking account
  2. Synchronize checking data
  3. Generate reconciliation reports
  4. Send and receive email
  5. Create and manage personal budget
  6. Manage customer contacts
  7. Display tutorial videos
  8. Edit videos
  9. Display the local weather forecast for the next 5 days

It should be clear that one or more of the later items on the list do not belong in Checkwriter 1.0. This is how product visions work. They provide a filter through which potential features can be run during the life of the project to determine if they are inside or outside the project’s scope of work. As powerful as this is, the product vision will only catch the larger features that threaten the project work scope. To catch the finer grain threats to scope creep, a product road map needs to be defined by the product owner.

How does Agile help with long term planning?

I’m often involved in discussions about Agile that question its efficacy in one way or another. This is, in my view, a very good thing and I highly encourage this line of inquiry. It’s important to challenge the assumptions behind Agile so as to counteract any complacency or expectation that it is a panacea to project management ills. Even so, with apologies to Winston Churchill, Agile is the worst form of project management…except for all the others.

Challenges like this also serve to instill a strong understanding of what an Agile mindset is, how it’s distinct from Agile frameworks, tools, and practices, and where it can best be applied. I would be the first to admin that there are projects for which a traditional waterfall approach is best. (For example, maintenance projects for nuclear power reactors. From experience, I can say traditional waterfall project management is clearly the superior approach in this context.)

A frequent challenge the idea that with Agile it is difficult to do any long-term planning.

Consider the notion of vanity vs actionable metrics. In many respects, large or long-term plans represent a vanity leading metric. The more detail added to a plan, the more people tend to believe and behave as if such plans are an accurate reflection of what will actually happen. “Surprised” doesn’t adequately describe the reaction when reality informs managers and leaders of the hard truth. I worked a multi-million dollar project many years ago for a Fortune 500 company that ended up being canceled. Years of very hard work by hundreds of people down the drain because projected revenues based on a software product design over seven years old were never going to materialize. Customers no longer wanted or needed what the product was offering. Our “solution” no longer had a problem to solve.

Agile – particularly more recent thinking around the values and principles in the Manifesto – acknowledges the cognitive biases in play with long-term plans and attempts to put practices in place that compensate for the risks they introduce into project management. One such bias is reflected in the planning fallacy – the further out the planning window extends into the future, the less accurate the plan. An iterative approach to solving problems (some of which just happen to use software) challenges development teams on up through managers and company leaders to reassess their direction and make much smaller course corrections to accommodate what’s being learned. As you can well imagine, we may have worked out how to do this in the highly controlled and somewhat predictable domain of software development, however, the critical areas for growth and Agile applicability are at the management and leadership levels of the business.

Another important aspect the Agile mindset is reflected in the Cone of Uncertainty. It is a deliberate, intentional recognition of the role of uncertainty in project management. Yes, the goal is to squeeze out as much uncertainty (and therefore risk) as possible, but there are limits. With a traditional project management plan, it may look like everything has been accounted for, but the rest of the world isn’t obligated to follow the plan laid out by a team or a company. In essence, an Agile mindset says, “Lift your gaze up off of the plan (the map) and look around for better, newer, more accurate information (the territory.) Then, update the plan and adjust course accordingly.” In Agile-speak, this is what is behind phrases like “delivery dates emerge.”

Final thought: You’ll probably hear me say many times that nothing in the Agile Manifesto can be taken in isolation. It’s a working system and some parts if it are more relevant than others depending on the project and the timing. So consider what I’ve presented here in concert with the Agile practices of developing good product visions and sprint goals. Product vision and sprint goals keep the project moving in the desired direction without holding it on an iron-rails-track that cannot be changed without a great deal of effort, if at all.

So, to answer the question in the post title, Agile helps with long term planning by first recognizing the the risks inherent in such plans and implementing process changes that mitigate or eliminate those risks. Unpacking that sentences would consist of listing all the risks inherent with long-term planning and the mechanics behind and reasons why scrum, XP, SAFe, LeSS, etc., etc., etc. have been developed.

Behind the Curtain: The Delivery Team Member Role

Even with the formalization of Agile practices into numerous frameworks and methodologies, I have to say not much has changed for the software developer or engineer with respect to how they get work done. I’m not referring to technology. The changes in what software developers and engineers use to get work done has been seismic. The biggest shift in the “how,” in my experience, is that what were once underground practices are now openly accepted and encouraged.

When I was coding full time, in the pre-Agile days and under the burden of CMM, we followed all the practices for documenting use cases, hammering out technical and functional specs, and laboriously talking through requirements. (I smile when I hear developers today complain about the burden of meetings under Scrum.) And when it came time to actually code, I and my fellow developers set the multiple binders of documentation aside and engaged in many then unnamed Agile practices. We mixed and matched use cases in a way that allowed for more efficient coding of larger functional components. We “huddled” each morning in the passage way to cube pods to discuss dependencies and brainstorm solutions to technical challenges. Each of these became more efficiently organized in Agile as backlog refinement and daily stand-ups. We had numerous other loose practices that were not described in tomes such as CMM.

But Agile delivery teams today are frequently composed of more than just technical functional domains. There may be non-technical expertise included as integral members of the team. Learning strategists, content editors, creative illustrators, and marketing experts may be part of the team, depending on the objectives of the project. Consequently, this represents a significant challenge to technical members of the team (i.e. software development and  tech QA) who are unused to working with non-technical team members. Twenty years ago a developer who might say “Leave me alone so I can code.” would have been viewed as a dedicated worker. Today, it’s a sign that the developer risks working in isolation and consequently delivering something that is mis-matched with the work being done by the rest of the team.

On an Agile delivery team, whether composed of a diverse set of functional domains or exclusively technical experts, individual team members need to be thinking of the larger picture and the impact of their work on that of their team mates and the overall work flow. They need to be much more attentive to market influences than in the past. The half-life of major versions, let along entire products, is such that most software products outside a special niche can’t survive without leveraging Agile principles and practices. Their knowledge must expand beyond just their functional domain. The extent to which they possess this knowledge is reflected in the day-to-day behaviors displayed by the team and it’s individuals.

  • Is everyone on the team sensitive and respectful of everyone else’s time? This means following through on commitments and promises, including agreed upon meeting start times. One person showing up five minutes late to a 15 minute stand-up has just missed out on a third of the meeting at least. If the team waits for everyone to show up before starting, the late individual has just squandered 5 minutes multiplied by the number of team mates. For a 6 member team, that’s a half hour. And if it happens every day, that’s 2.5 hours a week. It adds up quickly. Habitual late-comers are also signaling a lack of respect to other team members. They are implicitly saying “Me and my time is more important than anyone else on the team.” Unchecked, this quickly spills over into other areas of the team’s interactions. Enforcing an on-time rule like this is key to encouraging the personal discipline necessary to work effectively as a team. When a scrum master keeps the team in line with a few basic items like this, the larger discipline issues never seem to arise. As U.S. Army General Ann Dunwoody (ret.) succinctly points out in her book, never walk by a mistake. Doing so gives implicit acceptance for the transgression. Problems blossom from there, and it isn’t a pretty flower. (As a scrum master, I cannot “make” someone show up on time. But I can address the respect aspect of this issue by always starting on time. That way, late-comers stand out as late, not more important. Over time, this tends to correct the lateness issue as well.)
  • Everyone on the team must be capable of tracking a constantly evolving set of dependencies and knowing where their work fits within the flow. To whom will they be delivering work? From whom are they expecting completed work? The answer to these questions may not be a name on the immediate team. Scrum masters must periodically explicitly ask these questions if the connections aren’t coming out naturally during stand-ups. Developing this behavior is about coaching the team to look beyond the work on their desk and understand how they are connected to the larger effort. Software programmers seem to have a natural tendency to build walls around their work. Software engineers less so. And on teams with diverse functional groups it is important for both the scrum master and product owner to be watchful for when barriers appear for reasons that have more to due to lack of familiarity across functional domains than anything else.
  • Is the entire team actively and consistently engaged with identifying and writing stories?
  • Is the team capable and willing to cross domain boundaries and help? Are they interested in learning about other parts of the product and business?

Product owners and scrum masters need to be constantly scanning for these and other signs of disengagement as well as opportunities to connect cross functional needs.